Ganpati Decorations For Home That Environmentally Friendly

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Even when it comes to commemorating Ganesh Chaturthi, there are various methods to contribute to environmental protection. With the Coronavirus crisis looming, this becomes even more critical. You may create a festive ambiance in a green fashion by following the simple principles of reduce, reuse, and recycle, without jeopardising the health and safety of your home and those who live in it. Eco-friendly Ganpati holiday celebrations have quietly gained popularity over the years, with individuals choosing eco-friendly Ganesh idols. People are also interested in eco-friendly decorations, according to Ashni Desai, owner of Bloom ’89, a premium décor and gifting company. Instead of utilising thermocol temples, Desai proposes using rich fabrics for the backdrop. “Brightly coloured fabrics and rich brocades can be easily stored and reused the following year. Also, a clay temple or a temple made of recycled papier-mâché draped with cloth can be built to house the eco-friendly Ganesh statue without harming the environment,” Desai adds.

New trends in Ganpati decoration for home
According to Pameli Kayal, an architect and interior designer, there are certain to be many things in any home that can be reused, from garments to accessories like bottles, towels, cartons, old papers, or napkins. Because many of you are still hesitant to venture out and only purchase when absolutely necessary, this could be your go-to option for bringing home holiday cheer this year. Additionally, the products indicated above can be utilised to teach recycling and reuse to youngsters at home.

“This is a wonderful way to bring the family together around the holidays.” Before purchasing any expensive new item, consider whether you truly require it. Repainting an old trunk and laying a mattress or pillow on top of it, for example, is an easy method to provide more seating area for guests during the holiday season. You can additionally embroider the rims or cover them with a material of your choice. Cushion covers can be made from old T-shirts and silk kurtis. “A lot can be accomplished with little or no money,” Kayal continues. Plastic, thermocol, and other artificial accessories can be replaced with natural, biodegradable materials when it comes to decoration. Other eco-friendly home décor possibilities include traditional earthen lamps, linen, coconut shells, repurposed glass, potted plants, and so on.

Ganpati decoration with eco-friendly lighting
You can use energy-saving LED bulbs for lighting. “You can use paper and cloth as shades to make a decorative element out of it.” “You can also turn everyday materials like bottles, fish bowls, coconut shells, cold drink cans, and so on into show pieces with a little creativity,” Kayal says. For an eco-friendly Ganpati display, use LED string lights to add shine to the décor. String lights around a floral toran on the front door, the dining table legs, behind sheer curtains, and on plants and trees LEDs can also be used as pendants, chandeliers, and wall sconces in a variety of styles. For an ethereal look, paint old twigs vivid colours, wrap them in small LED lights, and set them in a vase. Choose multi-colored LEDs in the shape of auspicious symbols like ohm, swastika, or mangal kalash for a glittering backdrop for Lord Ganesha.

Ways to make Ganpati decorations more festive
Another method to give a festive touch is to use fresh flowers such as marigolds, mogra, and roses to decorate the house. In the entrance, urlis or glass bowls with floating candles and elaborately painted diyas might be used. “Coordinate the decorations by colour or choose a theme for your temple area. Opt for steel plates or mirror trays for puja thalis, which can be easily customised with colourful accessories and paint,” Desai advises. Flowers and grains can be used to decorate puja thalis. Use geru (red earth soil), turmeric, henna, and rice powder to make a rangoli. Freshen up the space by cleaning it with baking soda and lemon water to make it more inviting.

Ways to make Ganpati decorations more festive
Another method to give a festive touch is to use fresh flowers such as marigolds, mogra, and roses to decorate the house. In the entrance, urlis or glass bowls with floating candles and elaborately painted diyas might be used. “Coordinate the decorations by colour or choose a theme for your temple area. Opt for steel plates or mirror trays for puja thalis, which can be easily customised with colourful accessories and paint,” Desai advises. Flowers and grains can be used to decorate puja thalis. Use geru (red earth soil), turmeric, henna, and rice powder to make a rangoli. Freshen up the space by cleaning it with baking soda and lemon water to make it more inviting.

Do’s and don’ts for making an eco-friendly Ganpati display at home:

  • Decorate with dried leaves, twigs, branches, beetle nuts, and little rounded pebbles that have been painted.
  • Paper kites and pinwheels can be used as decorations.
  • Those with a creative streak can produce décor items out of recycled paper origami flowers or paper quilling art.
  • To decorate and build the temple or throne on which the Ganesha statue will be placed, use biodegradable materials such as bamboo, jute, cane, cork, coloured strings, hay, and coir ropes. The pillars can be made out of banana leaves with stems or bamboo plants.
  • A tiny vertical garden can be created on one wall and used as a backdrop for the Ganpati idol. Alternatively, you can set the Ganpati idol beneath a gorgeous bonsai tree in a small tray, which is lit up with fairy lights.
  • Beads, multi-colored sheers, or vintage dupattas can all be used as decorations.
  • Use coconut shells as diyas or make yellow-colored diyas by mixing turmeric powder into wheat flour dough.
  • Plastics should be avoided since they are difficult to recycle. Instead, store the puja’s accessories in cane baskets.
  • To distribute prasad, use fabric or little paper bags made from old newspapers and embellished with dried flowers or elegant ribbons.
  • Instead of using thermocol plates, use biodegradable alternatives like banana leaf and bamboo plates. Drinks should be served in earthen pots or kulhads.
  • Used bottles can be used to build a table lamp. Decoupage (the art of adorning a surface with paper cutouts and covering the surface with varnish (or adhesive)) can brighten glass bottles for décor.
  • Old card boxes, textile flowers, discarded costume jewellery, glitter, and pearls can all be used to make torans and rangolis.
  • Use fairy lights to brighten up the temple area. To add a distinctive décor element, these lights can also be set in a corner or in a simple coloured glass jar.
  • Separate the garbage and dispose of it responsibly. Compost can be made from organic material such as flowers and leaves that have been collected.

Word of caution
Cities are restricting communal festivals and idol immersions in light of the increased cases of Coronavirus illnesses. Direct immersion of idols has been prohibited by the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC), for example. This year, the idol immersion will be conducted through a number of collection centres that will gather idols from individuals and complete the process. Those who refuse to accept this alternative must submerge the idol in their own homes. To safeguard the environment, it is preferable to submerge the idol in a government-constructed water tank or artificial pond, or to immerse the clay idol in a pail of water at home. Use the clay water that has been dissolved to water your plants.

 

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